AmsterdamX.pm

AmsterdamX is a Perl Mongers group of English-speaking Perl developers in Amsterdam. We meet to have talks and/or social time every so often, usually monthly.

Read more about who we are.

Meetings and Events

All meetings organized by AmsterdamX.pm are completely 100% free-of-charge, and everyone is invited. Anyone can give talks on almost any subject, while Perl-related subjects are obviously more recommended. :) Meetings are usually held at Booking.com, 1017CE, Herengracht 597.

If you feel like giving a talk, contact the AmsterdamX Perl Mongers mailing list, or contact Sawyer X directly.

The meetings are suitable for beginners, intermediates, and advanced!

Upcoming events

Next Scheduled Event

Date:
29th, June Monday.
Time:
18.30–20.30 (approximately)
Location:
Booking.com, 1017CE, Herengracht 597 (Google Map), Monaco Room, 1st floor.
Please fill in this form if you're arriving.
Talks:
  1. Maxim Vuets :: Warm and fuzzy text matching

    I had a problem: got two somewhat-structured music playlists that were overlapping and I wanted to merge them together.

    In this talk I will explain what fuzzy text matching is; cover a couple of techniques to do it; and showcase how Text::Fuzzy helped me to solve the problem. Colored terminal examples included.

  1. Peter Rabbitson (Ribasushi) :: From 2D to Tree-D

    This talk will go over the internals of the DBIC rowparser, showcasing a practical example when code generation is useful (and thus justified). This is purely an algorithmic presentation - no knowledge of DBIC or even databases is necessary.

  1. Ben Tyler :: Distributed Systems 102: CRDTs for Poets and Perl Hackers

    In which a humanities major reads a bunch of papers on distributed systems theory and attempts to explain them in plain language.

    Fortunately, conflict free replicated data types (CRDTs) are just a straightforward monotonically increasing join semi-lattice with a least upper bound accomplished by enforcing idempotent and commutative merge functions (producing strong eventual consistency as long as the transport is eventually reliable). No sweat!

    Come learn about conflict free replicated data types, what they can do for you, and why they might be interesting for all kinds of applications, not just for the Amazons and Googles of the world.